10 Year Anniversary Green Pets America

10 Year Anniversary Green Pets America.

Green Pets America is not your usual rescue the dogs nonprofit. Hi, I’m Steven Monahan, Founder-Executive Director of Green Pets America Charities. We are both an animal welfare and an animal rights organization. Green Pets America cover’s a lot of needs in our overarching vision to keep families and their companion animals safe and together.

As an “animal welfare” organization we are a compassionate and articulate voice for the safety and compassionate care of our beloved companion animals.

As an “animal rights” organization we argue for a right to life for all companion animals through our Companion Animal Right to Life group, named CARLA.

The vision of Green Pets America is in its name. Pets, or more appropriately stated “companion animals” are a precious resource to be sustained and not thrown away.  Green Pets believes our companion animals are not disposable but deserve a right to life and when in shelters must be rescued, renewed and rehomed. We were founded in Atlanta, GA in 2007. GPAC is a nationally recognized Gold Star Rated 501c3 Non-Profit Organization. Steve Monahan and GPAC were recognized by the State Senate of Georgia and other entities for their dedication to families and companion animals.

The concept for Green Pets America Charities was based on Steve’s desire to give a second chance at life for dogs sitting in death row kill shelters. Steve survived a terminal illness and felt compelled to help animals get a new chance at life, just as he was blessed to receive.

In the past 10 years, GPA has rescued, renewed and rehomed over 1,000 death row shelter animals throughout Georgia. Dog Food was given to places like Papas Pantry, Must Ministries, and The Cherokee Animal Shelter.  A need was filled by helping families keep their pets with them when the tough times hit. Additionally, we have helped children in need of a service dog secure one so they can get around safely, living a happy wholesome life just like all their friends.

10 Year Anniversary Green Pets America.Green Pets is keenly aware a phenomenon called “Black Dog Syndrome”.  It’s a sad truth that leaves black dogs in shelters much longer than their tan-furred brethren.  Just like certain breeds, dogs shouldn’t be judged on the color of their fur or their breed.

Green Pets helped honor our local working K9s by providing a fenced in area at the Woodstock police station for a K9 outdoor “break room”.  Our police K9 is on the job protecting us 24/7 and Green Pets America believes we all should love and celebrate these working officers, with the dignity, honor, and respect they deserve.

Steve Monahan, Green Pets Founder, said; Green Pets is not your basic rescue the dogs nonprofit. In our day to day efforts, we seek to fill the gaps in animal welfare that exist by providing needed resources to ensure families and their beloved pets remain bonded and together in hard times.

We listen to families and their individual needs. It may be helping with funds to pay for routine veterinary care for a beloved pet. Or emergency care when a dog or cat is injured.  It even means providing resources for spay and neutering. The State Senate of Georgia and City Council of Woodstock Georgia recognized Green Pets for their service to Georgia’s families and pets.

As Green Pets takes a moment to look back on the last 10 years, we look to the future not the past. We work for and look forward to the bright and shining day when our companion animals will  be cared for with compassion and have a right to life, just as we do. Our companion animals teach us how to live with one another in peace. They teach us unconditional love for ourselves and for one another.

If you love dogs as we do and want to help them live full lives we know you will love viewing and reading our two best selling books. ART OF THE BLACK DOG, AND RESCUE RENEW REHOME. Both available on AMAZON BOOKS.Rescue Renew Rehome

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Green Pets not basic rescue the dogs nonprofit

Green Pets not basic rescue the dogs nonprofit. Hi, I’m Steven Monahan, Founder-Executive Director of Green Pets Charities. On this site I share my insights, expertise and opinions on the human animal bond; including, nutrition, pet food, total wellness, animal welfare and animal rights: As well as news, trends and developments in the global pet industry.


Green Pets is not basic “rescue the dogs” nonprofit. We cover a lot of needs in our overarching vision of keeping families and pets together. And being a compassionate and articulate voice for our beloved companion animals.

The vision of Green Pets is in its name.  Pets are a precious resource to be sustained and not thrown away.  Green Pets believes pets are not disposable but rather a resource that needs to be rescued, renewed and rehomed. Founded in Atlanta, GA in 2007. Gold Star Rated 501c3 Non-Profit Organization. Recognized by the State Senate of Georgia and City Council of Woodstock for our works to the State and Community.

Green Pets not basic rescue the dogs nonprofitThe concept for Green Pets was based on my love of animals and best-selling animal welfare book, Rescue Renew Rehome.  RRR was written to share the human animal bond. And help shelters adopt more dogs.

In the past 10 years, GPA have rescued, renewed and rehomed almost 1,000 death row shelter animals throughout Georgia.

Dog Food was given to places like Papas Pantry, Must Ministries, and The Cherokee Animal Shelter.  A need was filled by helping families keep their pets with them when the tough times hit.

Green Pets helped children needing service dog to help them live to the best of their abilities.

Green Pets is keenly aware a phenomenon called “Black Dog Syndrome”.  It’s a sad truth that leaves black dogs in shelters much longer than their tan furred brethren.  Just like certain breeds, dogs shouldn’t be judged on the color of their fur or their breed.

Green Pets helped honor our local working K9s by providing a fenced in area at the Woodstock police station for a K9 outdoor “break room”.  Our police K9 is on the job protecting us 24/7 and Green Pets America believes we all should love and celebrate these working officers, with the dignity, honor and respect they deserve.

Steve Monahan, Green Pets Founder, said; Green Pets is not your basic rescue the dogs nonprofit. In our day to day efforts, we seek to fill the gaps in animal welfare that exist in providing needed resources to keep families and their beloved pets remain bonded together in hard times.

We listen to families and their individual needs.  It may be helping with funds to pay for routine veterinary care for a beloved pet. Or emergency care when a dog or cat is injured.  It even means providing resources for spay and neutering.

The State Senate of Georgia and City Council of Woodstock Georgia recognized Green Pets for their service to Georgia’s families and pets.

As Green Pets takes a moment to look back on the last 10 years, we look to the future and helping our surrounding area to “Live Green” with their pets.  Our Pets are so precious to us, as they give us unconditional love, we should all be giving them a chance to live healthy, happy and safe.

Green Pets not basic rescue the dogs nonprofit.

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Clayton County Georgia Dog Starved to Death

Clayton County Georgia Dog Starved to Death

While people rail against cruelty to companion animals in China, Korea and other countries, companion animals are being tortured, abandoned to die in the streets, abused and starved to death right here in America. This is not acceptable. It must end.

This poor young dog was ignored by his owner and starved in his own backyard in Clayton County, Georgia. He died as a rescue group frantically rushed him to a vet to try to save his life.

This poor dog and his sister were left outside by their owners with no food or water. His sister survided thanks to the rescue group, but unfortunately Peace did not.

This continual abuse and inhumane cruelty to America’s companion animals must end. 

The rescue group named this dog Peace. Blessings upon those who rescue and save our companion animals from the wrath of soulless humans.

May Peace come to all America’s companion animals, killed by the cruelty of man for companion animals. May this young dog named Peace by his rescuers, finally find the peace of the Lord he was denied by Man on earth.

Companion Animal Rights

CAR

COMPANION ANIMAL RIGHTS.org

Throughout civilization, nations have codified the basic and essential rights of their society —rights that all agree must not be infringed upon by the government or other individuals or entities. In the United States, our Bill of Rights enumerates our societies enlightened cherished and essential rights including life and liberty and freedom from harm.

There is however no bill of rights for our companion animals in America. Every year over 4 million companion animals in America are killed in our animal shelters. Why? because companion animals are legally labeled merely as “Things” in the eyes of the law.  

Helpless companion animals must in this day and age be granted protection from the cruelty of man by man to companion animals. Join with us and donate to CAR as we work daily to bring the basic, essential rights of life and freedom from abuse, harm, punishment and death to companion animals in America.

DONATE

CAR

COMPANION ANIMAL RIGHTS.org

Driving Companion Animal Rights Forward

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Companion Animals Are Not Things

Legally our companion animals are classified as mere “things”. Learn what they really are.

I AM NOT A THING

 

I Am Not A Thing

I Am A Sentient Being – I Feel Emotions

I Am A  Cognizant Being – I Can Think

You Are A Homosapien Animal

I Am A Companion Animal

You Have A Right To Life

I deserve A Right To Life

Companion animals are not things: they possess sentient feelings and cognizant thinking just as we do.

Support the Companion Animal Right to Life Act.org as we argue for legal “personhood” for Companion animals, versus the present legal status of Companion animals as unintelligent, non feeling, non alive “things”.  

Changing the law is the only way to end the legal killing of Companion animals in our animal shelters. While Animal Welfare is good… Animal Rights are even better.

companion animal are not things

Donate to 

Companion Animal Right to Life Act.org 

Help us educate, fight and change the law for the legal status of “Personhood” for Companion Animals.

I am not a thingA program of Green Pets America Charities, Atlanta GA.

 501c3 IRS Certified – GoldStar Rated Non Profit Since 2005I am not a thing

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USA National Spay Neuter Law

Mexico City New Law Requires Dog And Cat Sterilization and Microchips.

Do you think this should be considered in the USA as well?

Mexico City has passed a new law requiring that all dogs and cats be microchipped and sterilized. ‘Potentially dangerous’ dog permits will also be required for breeds considered aggressive; such as, Pit Bulls, Rottweilers, and Mastiffs. Dogs permitted as “potentially dangerous’ cannot be walked in public without a muzzle, the Associated Press reports.

Mexico City pet owners, breeders and veterinarians are actively protesting the law which additionally mandates registration (licensing) of all cats and dogs, according to the Associated Press.

The Mexican Dog Fanciers Federation said the law was rushed through in early May without adequate consultation. Veterinarian group and breed clubs are arguing the law could endanger thousands of jobs at clinics, pet salons and breeding and training facilities by causing a sharp drop in pet numbers, according to HNGN.

The most controversial aspect of the law, of course, is the requirement that all pets must be sterilized. Mexico City, with nearly 9 million people, has a serious problem with strays, puppy mills, animal mistreatment and illegal pet sales, the AP reports.

The law is not yet formally enacted but is definitely designed to establish a new level of responsibility for animals and reflects a changing attitude that caused Mexico’s middle-class to spend $2.2 billion on pets in 2013.

The law also requires that collars are worn with visible ID tags, that dogs are leashed in public places; and adequate food, water and space is provided for owned pets, according to the AP.

Two other requirements designed to increase animal and public safety are that trainers cannot work with pets in public, and children under 14 will not be allowed to walk pets without an adult being present, the report states.

CULTURAL CHANGES IN MEXICO REGARDING PETS

An owned dog’s life in Mexico has traditionally consisted of days chained to the roof of the house, says Newsday.

Mexico has an estimated 20 million dogs or more, many of them roaming the streets hunting for food in the trash or spending their days shut up in apartments by owners who see them simply as living burglar alarms.

Last year, the problem gained international attention when authorities said five people had been killed by a pack of feral dogs in the Cerro de Estrella park in Iztapalapa, a poor eastern neighborhood of Mexico City.

LAW INTENDS TO ADDRESS PUPPY MILLS AND ILLEGAL SALES

“The decision to sterilize pets should be voluntary,” said Juan Luis Martinez, administrative director of the Mexican Dog Fanciers Federation.

Breeders who claim to be “legal” say the law violates an owner’s right to breed animals responsibly.

By forcing legitimate facilities out of business, puppy and kitten breeding in the hands of unscrupulous dealers who sell animals out of car trunks or from crates at street markets the AP reports.

Martinez told the AP that the law’s requirements, including fines from about $100 up to as much as $5,000, could encourage noncompliance and lead people to dump more animals in the street and parks.

What do you thinks about this. Should we consider it in America? ….Yes or No?

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What Are Eco Green No-Kill Animal Shelters?

It’s quiet here, even through the hum of activity sun and fresh air stream in. People walk in and out, greeting each other, bending down to pat heads and smile at the little ones. Welcome to the  21st century  no kill animal shelter.
Green BuildingTo the casual observer, an animal shelter may not seem like much of a design challenge: a structure that safely houses stray animals for subsequent adoption.  But start to consider the details of the building. It must hold different types of animals, in differently sized pens, for variable lengths of time. It should be accessible to the public and welcoming to volunteers while maintaining strict health and safety standards. It has limited staff and resources but must relentlessly promote adoption. Day-to-day operations require basic medical capabilities, laundry facilities, storage, and quarantine areas. It must not be too big (causing unnecessary maintenance and staffing demands) or too small (causing overcrowding and/or excessive distress to the animals).

“Because of their unique services, animal shelters must have the disease-prevention components of a hospital, the functional capabilities of a police station, and the user-friendly appeal of a library, ” said Geoffrey L. Handy with The Humane Society of the United States.

no kill animal shelter USA

Historically, shelters have gotten little architectural consideration. The prototypical shelter — a concrete building with individual chain-link kennels — reflects this inattention. Many of these structures were built-in the 1950’s and 1960’s and provided few areas for play, enrichment and human attention. This utterly utilitarian approach reflected the mentality that shelters are mere holding facilities.

no kill shelter USA

Over the following decades, public attitudes toward animal welfare, low-cost spay/neuter policies, and responsible pet ownership evolved. Euthanasia rates dropped from around 24 million pets in 1970 (around 81 percent of those entering shelters) to 6 million (around 58 percent of those entering shelters) in 1996, but shelter directors wanted to drop that number further. They began to think about how facility design could enhance their mission by boosting adoption numbers and creating a better experience for both animals and visitors, and a few architects recognized an opportunity to influence the effectiveness of these organizations from the outside in.

Group (or pod) housing is a newer development with a big, direct impact on the quality of life of shelter dogs. It can take many forms — from modestly sized rooms or kennels that house two to three pups, to shared play spaces that allow caregivers to control how much time dogs spend together and apart. Isolated housing is still used, as it can be beneficial in certain contexts, like with newly admitted dogs undergoing medical or behavioral evaluations.

The Humane Society of Silicon Valley (HSSV), a shelter in Milpitas, CA, recently constructed a new facility (pictured above) they call an “animal community center.” There, temperamentally compatible dogs may be housed in small groups once they pass their medical exams and behavioral evaluations. They live in “real life”-type rooms with proper doors and occasional furniture, which acclimates them to scenarios they will find in new homes when they are eventually adopted. The rooms are designed to insulate noise effectively, reducing stimulation from outside commotion. This isn’t only beneficial to the dogs; it also has a huge impact on visitors, who are no longer overwhelmed by cacophonous howling. Functionally, the real life rooms mean the dogs have less casual exposure to the public, so volunteers are trained to facilitate visits and give potential adopters the tactile experience of meeting the dogs.

While shared, real-life rooms have their advantages, for many shelters they are not an option due to budget, space or staff limitations. For those cases there are other design solutions.

Dr. Kate Hurley is the program director for the Koret Shelter Medicine Program at UC Davis. She advocates dog runs (housing one or more pups) split into two sides by a guillotine door. These runs give shelters greater flexibility. Dogs can be grouped in compatible pairs in the runs, with the doors left open to allow more space to run around. Or, if and when it makes more sense, the guillotine door can be lowered to keep dogs separated. This solution is useful for shelter staff as it facilitates quick and sanitary cleaning protocols, allowing kennel attendants to isolate dogs on one side of the run by closing the door while they clean the other side, minimizing disease contamination. The guillotine door can also be raised and lowered to manage structured play and quiet time, as well as during feedings, to minimize food guarding between pups.

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Kennels that are divided into two areas — whether real-life rooms or more typical runs split by guillotine doors — have an important added benefit to the dogs’ well-being and stress levels. By creating a space for the pups to eliminate apart from their sleeping and eating area, shelters promote good bathroom habits. A canine has such a strong urge to separate its eating and sleeping space from its elimination areas that, according to Dr. Hurley, around 75 percent of all shelter dogs — even strays — will do this given the opportunity. According to Hurley, this significantly reduces stress and supports a desired behavior once the dog goes to its adopted home.

Additional kennel features create an environment that is easier to clean, manages odors better, and helps control disease. Sealed concrete flooring, for example, saves significant amounts on heating and cooling bills — funds that can be funneled back into animal care. High-density coatings for interior walls and floors withstand pressure hoses and detergent better than other finishes. Kennel areas with plenty of windows that bring in as much natural air and light as possible help reduce odors and create a healthier and more soothing experience for both the animals and their visitors. Observation/isolation rooms with self-contained ventilation systems allow ill dogs to be treated without jeopardizing other members of the population.pet park USA

Better design doesn’t just help the dogs who live there but it’s also beneficial for the people who visit, volunteer, and work at the shelter.

For staff, play and rest areas that keep dogs more comfortable and stress free help create a calmer and safer work environment. Hutchison observes that “real-life rooms, well-designed kennels, and other features help volunteers and staff work with animals in a non-threatening, comfortable environment.”

Facilities that are cheerful, light and welcoming also create a more pleasant experience for visitors who are turned off by the “sad factor” of entering a shelter, expecting to find dogs in prison-like conditions. Kennels with home-like furnishings or enough space for chairs, for example, allow people to interact with the animals more easily and feel comfortable taking the time they need to get to know their potential new companions.

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Facilities that are pleasant to be in also naturally attract increased volunteer interest. Jeanne Wu, vice president of human resources and volunteering at HSSV, says that the number of volunteer hours given to the organization has grown 40 percent, from 53,000 to more than 74,000, since it moved to its new facility two years ago. The number of volunteers has also increased, by about 50 percent. HSSV values these hours at about $1.5 million per year — an incredible boon to the organization. Wu explains that HSSV, which has 95 full-time staff members, could not maintain optimal levels of socialization, care, and adoptions without altruistic help. Bill Hutchison feels the same way, “Volunteers enjoy being a part of such a progressively designed facility. Having a variety of design functions that address the needs of animals in many different situations is important to volunteers who know that animals in shelters have unique needs.” A dedicated volunteer room with lockers for personal items and a place to sit down, socialize, and relax supports morale and makes the shelter a fulfilling and comfortable place to spend time.

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While designing a shelter that includes enriching features can cost more money, certain elements may save money over the long-term through energy savings, an increase in volunteer numbers and/or hours, or reduced medical expenses. Through the design and integration of better systems for disease-management and stress reduction, UC Davis’ Hurley sees shelters slowly shifting from being primarily adoption centers to places where prevention happens. One day their focus may even transition from finding homes for surrendered pets and strays to providing services — such as low-cost training, behavioral hotlines, and workshops to troubleshoot problems with neighbors or landlords — to help keep animals in their homes, thereby avoiding the shelter system entirely.

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One day we will see no-kill state of the art green movement animal shelters across America –

All things can happen if you believe and if you work towards them.

Green Pets America.org

Rescue Recycle Relove

Donate Now To Help us Build Green No Kill Shelters

Go Green

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