D-PAC Political Action Committee. Lobbying for America’s dogs

DOG PAC. D-PAC
07/22/2022 0 Comments

D-PAC.org. Political Action Committee. Lobbying for America’s dogs.

A political action committee (or PAC) is a tax-exempt organization that raises money via monetary donations from individuals, unions, and organizations. The primary purpose of a PAC is to encourage the election of political candidates, who support the mission and cause of the PAC. PACs exist to solve problems via legislation, and support political campaigns, ballot initiatives, lobbying, and legislation.

DOG PAC. D-PAC

D-PAC Political Action Committee. Lobbying for America's dogs

Homelessness for people and their companion animals is rising every day. Eerily reminiscent of America’s Great Depression in 1938.

D-PAC IS THE ONLY PAC DEDICATED SOLELY TO REPRESENTING HOMELESS SHELTER, AND HOMELESS INDIVIDUALS WITH STREET DOGS IN AMERICA.

OUR SINGLE FOCUS IS RAISING AWARENESS AND SEEKING LEGISLATION AND POVERTY PROGRAMS DIRECTLY FROM OUR LOCAL, STATE, AND NATIONAL LEGISLATORS.

AS A PAC, D-PAC GETS THE ATTENTION OF THOSE WITH THE POLITICAL CLOUT TO END HOMELESSNESS FOR OUR COMPANION ANIMALS AND THEIR PET PARENTS.

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What Is a PAC?

A political action committee (or PAC) is a tax-exempt organization that raises money and collects political contributions via monetary donations from individuals, unions, and organizations. The primary purpose of a PAC is to encourage the election of a candidate, or the defeat of another candidate. PACs exist to fund political campaigns, ballot initiatives, lobbying, and legislation.

A History of PACs in the United States.

The first PAC was established in 1943 after the US Congress prohibited unions from directly contributing to political parties and candidates. The Federal Election Commission of 1971 instituted the Federal Election Campaign Act, which placed new regulations and limitations on how much PACs can contribute to federal elections.

In 2002, the Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act (BRCA) placed further restrictions on PACs. The Supreme Court Ruling on BCRA barred national political party committees from raising funds without federal limits, and prohibited issue-advocacy ads paid for by corporations that named a candidate prior to an election.

In 2010, the Supreme Court overturned sections of BRCA in Citizens United v. FEC. The court decided it was unconstitutional to limit the amount of funds that unions and corporations can contribute to political messaging.

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The 5 Types of PACs

There are 5 types of political action committees, which include:

  • 1. Separate Segregated Funds (SSFs): SSFs are political committees established by corporations, labor unions, membership organizations, or trade associations. They may only solicit contributions from an individual connected with the sponsoring organization.
  • 2. Nonconnected committees: Nonconnected committees are not established or sponsored by any organization or union, and can target the general public for their fundraising.
  • 3. Super PACs: A Super PAC is a committee that may gather unlimited funds from individuals, corporations, unions, and other PACs to finance campaign independent expenditures. Super PACs are not permitted to spend money on political parties or campaigns but can spend unlimited funds on other political activities—like travel and events.
  • 4. Hybrid PACs: A Hybrid PAC is similar to a Super PAC, insofar that it can spend unlimited funds on political activity outside of a campaign. Hybrid PACs, however, can contribute funds to a political party, candidate, or campaign subject to the limitations of SSFs and nonconnected committees.
  • 5. Leadership PACs: A leadership PAC is a committee established by a candidate or individual holding federal office. Members of Congress, both in the Senate and the House of Representatives, can establish leadership PACs to support federal candidates of their political party
DOG PAC. D-PAC

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