Black Dog Syndrome

black dog syndrome

Black Dog Syndrome

As Executive Director and founder of a dog rescue nonprofit, Green Pets America Charities I have spent the last 12 years involved with rescuing dogs from shelters. Everything from walking in and pulling them out of kill shelters, to taking them to vets, to bringing them to our rescue group, to placing them in foster care and working diligently to adopt them. I’ve spent many a weekend at Pet Smart with two dozen dogs trying to get them adopted.

Through all this, one thing became apparent to me. Black Dogs were the least adopted of all the dogs we rescued. They were the least adopted in the shelters we went into as well. We therefore had a higher than usual selection of black dogs, versus light colored or mixed color dogs to rescue from our area animal shelters.

What we also found was black dogs languished not only much longer in shelters, but rescue groups as well. Where we could adopt other colors out on average in three months, some black dogs took up to a year…. Some, even more.

So I did some research and found that our experience was not unusual, it was sadly normal. There is a phenomena and its named, Black Dog Syndrome (BDS). Black Dog Syndrome is known by shelters and rescue groups throughout America. Numerous respected national organizations have long recognized BDS as an issue that adversely affects the adoption rates of black pets.

So, what exactly is this syndrome? Black Dog Syndrome is a conscious and unconscious mental, emotional bias in people against black dogs, and black cats as well.

Because of this bias, black shelter dogs are the most overlooked, least adopted and one of the most euthanized dogs in our animal shelters.

So, what’s the story? Why are black dogs feared? Why is there this bias? Well, there are many reasons for what is known as “Black Dog Syndrome”, including superstitious fear of black dogs, “old wives’ tales” about black dogs, Black dogs depicted in movies and literature as evil or devilish. A scary, growling black dog can be seen in The Hound of the Baskervilles, the Harry Potter series and The Omen.

In a survey, Pet finder the respected national organization where we post our dogs available for adoption, animal shelter and rescue groups reported that most pets are listed for about 3 months, whereas, black dogs and senior or special needs dogs average 12 months on the Pet finder adoption site.

The only real fact, not ignorance, superstition or media and folklore bias is that black dogs do not photograph well on animal shelters and rescue groups websites, listing pictures of dogs for adoption. This is easily overcome however by simply photographing black dogs in front of blue screens or blue paper, as we have done at our rescue organization Green Pets America.

Now that I spend my time, not in hands on rescue, but providing education and awareness in animal welfare, I decided to bring Black Dog Syndrome, BDS to the forefront. To that end we created a Cause to get people educated, aware of BDS and get Black Dogs adopted into loving homes. The color of a dog has nothing to do with the dogs’ temperament or personality. Ask any owner of a black dog. Ask me, we have two. Our black dogs are as loving, playful, smart and a joy to be with each day as our other two, non-black dogs.

So what can you do?

You can adopt a black shelter or rescue dog.

You can talk about this sad bias and encourage friends or family to adopt a black dog.

Educate adults,  even school age kids about BDS! It’s generally an unconscious prejudice and most people will move past it once they’re aware.

Subscribe to the FREE, Black Dog Friday Daily Dog News.

Make a donation of whatever you can afford to,  http://BlackDogFriday.org to help a rescue group rescue, vet, feed, put into foster care, train, then adopt a black dog into a loving home.

Visit the Black Dog Friday store at http://cafepress.com/blackdogfriday. Make a purchase to show the world you love black dogs

Remind people it’s not the color of the dog, but the size of her heart that is important.

Steven Monahan, Founder – BlackDogFriday.org

black dog syndrome

 

 

 

MY VEGAN CANINE FOOD

 

my vegan canine

As a Vegan myself, it has been my dream to craft and sell a high quality line of Vegan Canine Food. Well, Green Pets America’s, “My Vegan Canine” Food is now on the drawing board.

After we complete our research and testing we’ll make the decision.

If you have suggestions for what you want to to see in a high quality vegan food for your canine companion animal, please drop us a note at Steve@GreenPetsAmerica.org. Let us know what you want to see included in, “My Vegan Canine”

Thank you,

Steven Monahan, Founder – Green Pets America.org

my vegan canine

189 Year Old Vegan Border Collie

Bramble a 189-Year-Old Vegan Border Collie, was the world’s oldest living dog.

Supermarket pet foods are often composed of ground-up parts of animals deemed by U.S. Department of Agriculture inspectors unfit for human consumption. The flesh of animals who fall into one of the categories of the four D’s—dead, dying, diseased, or disabled—is what often goes into pet food. Many of these animals have died of infections and other diseases.

In most all states it is legal to remove unusable parts from chickens and sell them to pet food manufacturers. Most pet foods contain the same hormones, pesticides, and antibiotics that are found in commercial meat products for humans

Vegetarian Dogs. Many vegetarians and vegans feed healthful, meatless diets to their companion animals. According to an article by PETA, one long life, healthy vegan dog example is that of Bramble, a 27-year-old border collie whose vegan diet of rice, lentils, and organic vegetables earned her consideration by the Guinness Book of World Records as the world’s oldest living dog in 2002.

189 Year Old Vegan Border Collie

The dog, Bramble, a blue merle Border Collie, lived in the UK. What’s most amazing about Bramble is he actually lived on a vegan only diet of rice, lentils and organic vegetables. Her owner said he ate once a day and exercised a lot.

The owner of the dog, Anne Heritage, was a vegan herself. She just fed Bramble a big bowl of vegan dinner every evening. She explains that Bramble “is an inspiration and it just goes to show that if we eat the right things and keep on exercising, our pets and ourselves can extend our life”.

Seven Human Years for Every One Dog Year.

The age of 189 years comes from the common usage of counting 7 human years for every one dog year. This method is sometimes debated, but any way you count it – Bramble lived a long life.

Studies have shown that the ailments associated with meat consumption in humans, such as allergies, cancer, and kidney, heart, and bone problems, also affect many nonhumans. Pet food has also been recalled during mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), scares because of the risk that contaminated meat was processed into the food. One deputy commissioner states that cats especially “are susceptible to BSE.”

The nutritional needs of dogs and cats are easily met with a balanced vegan diet and certain supplements, stated James Peden, author of Vegetarian Cats & Dogs.

Meat Or No Meat?

Some people wonder if it’s “unnatural” to omit meat from the diet of a dog or cat. Animals in the wild commonly eat quite a lot of plant matter. Besides, to feed them the meat that they would naturally eat, you would have to serve them whole mice or birds or allow them to hunt for themselves, an option that is unfair to native species of birds and other small animals, since companion cats and dogs have been removed from the food chain and have advantages that free-roaming animals lack.

Vegetarian or vegan dogs and cats enjoy their food and good health, and a vegan or vegetarian diet for your companion animal is ethically consistent with animal rights philosophy, and our green living beliefs at Green Pets America….Green Pets, People Planet.

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Green Pets America Charities – Humane Society – Since 2004. Gold Star is rated by GUIDESTAR. Top 1% of all nonprofits


Top 10 Pet Toxins 2016

Top 10 Pet Toxins 2016 – DATELINE: CNN CANINE NETWORK NEWS, ATLANTA GA.

www.CanineNetwork.com

Top 10 Pet Toxins 2016

 

March is National Animal Poison Prevention Month, and we’d like to kick it off by sharing our list of Top 10 Pet Toxins, most commonly ingested by pets—and reported to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC)—in 2015.

For the first time ever, over-the-counter medications and supplements surpassed prescription medications to take the top spot. Check out the full list below!

  1. Over-the-counter medications: These medications, including herbal and other natural supplements, attracted the most concern this year for the first time in the APCC’s history, with more than 28,500 cases reported. This category is exceptionally large, encompassing nearly 7,000 products.
  2. Human prescription medications: Prescribed human medications fell to the second spot on the list, representing nearly 16% of all cases. The types of medication to which animals were most often exposed correlate with the most popular medications prescribed to humans.
  3. Insecticides: Insect poisons accounted for nearly 9% of the calls to APCC (more than 15,000 cases). If label directions are not followed, these products can be very dangerous to pets.
  4. Human foods: Pets—especially dogs, who ingest human foods more often than cats—can get into serious trouble by ingesting onions, garlic, grapes, raisins, alcohol and xylitol. More than 14,600 APCC cases in 2015 involved human foods.
  5. Household items: Products found around the home made up more than 14,000 cases in 2015. The most common items for this category include cleaning products, fire logs and paint.
  6. Veterinary medications: Overdoses of medications prescribed by veterinarians represented more than 7% of total cases in 2015. Chewable medications are very appealing to pets, requiring extra caution.
  7. Chocolate: Chocolate continues be very problematic for pets, accounting for more than 7% of all APCC cases in 2015—averaging more than 30 cases a day. The darker the chocolate, the more dangerous.
  8. Plants: Indoor and outdoor plants represented nearly 5% of the calls to the APCC in 2015. Most of these calls involve cats and houseplants. Be sure to understand the toxicity of plants before putting them in or around your house.
  9. Rodenticides: Rodent poisons can be just as toxic to pets as they are to the mice and rats these products are designed to kill. Last year, APCC handled more than 8,100 cases involving rodenticides.
  10. Lawn and garden products. These products, including herbicides and fungicides, round out the top ten, accounting for 3% of all APCC calls. It’s incredibly important to store lawn and garden products out of the reach of pets.

Top 10 Pet Toxins 2016

 

 

 

Green Pets America Video with Brett Butler from Anger Management TV Show

Green Pets America was founded in 2006. Our mission is rescue and animal welfare advocacy. We work daily to end neglect, abuse, cruelty and exploitation of animals, ensuring that their interests and well-being are humanely protected as we work to end the 125 year old failed practice of euthanizing 4 million pets annually in America.

Green Pets America is a non-profit a 501c3 nonprofit. We have been awarded the Gold Star seal for transparency and trust from Guide Star, Americas non-profit rating agency. Additionally we received the humanitarian award from the State Senate of Georgia for serving Georgia’s families and animals.

We are a no kill green recycle and adopt organization, dedicated to finding safe loving homes for all adoptable pets we rescue. We are proud to be a part of the no kill solution to ending pet homelessness in America

Every year Americans discard 8 million dogs and cats. America’s shelters adopt out 4 million and destroy the remaining 4 million. This tragedy must end. We must become a Green Pets Nation. Please join with Green Pets America to advocate for going green!